This entry is part 17 of 44 in the series Breast Cancer Posts

I had another full day up at the local VA Hospital, at least half of it spent waiting, either for appointment times to arrive, or for doctors/nurses to meet me once I was there. If I’d come home during the day, I’d have had to turn right around to go back up, so it was easier for me to take books and stuff and my music and read while I was there.

My first appointment was for the echocardiogram. For this, I had to undress halfway, and a technician used a sonogram machine to take readings and recordings of my heart’s activity. He took readings from right above my heart, through the breastbone, did some work under my arm against my side next to my left breast, and then at the point right below the breastbone, which required him pushing up and in. Most of it was uncomfortable, though it hurt a bit when he was on my chest with the sensor because he had to press up into the soft tissue of my breast. The part which hurt the most, and it was primarily at a level of great discomfort, was when he took the reading with the sensor under the end of my breastbone. He also had to hook me up to, if I remember correctly, an EKG machine to monitor my heart in order to tell the sonogram machine when to record my heart’s functions. We had a nice chat about everything, including his path into sonography, while he did this, so I was quite distracted for much of the procedure. This took approximately an hour.

After this, I went to the lab for the blood draw. Very nice technician there answered all my nosy questions about the vials and where the blood was going (tests for the Oncologists and for the genetic testing). I always ask them to use a butterfly needle when they draw blood because sometimes them switching vials out on the standard needle with the vial holder jerks too much and causes minor pain. This woman’s touch was very gentle, she was very thorough, and when she removed the butterfly needle, I barely felt it. She also managed to get blood from the main vein in my arm—the one in the middle of the elbow pit—instead of the peripheral vein on the outside of the elbow pit when the arm is turned up for such a blood draw.

Then I had lunch. I should say there was some confusion over the phone when I was told about the echocardiogram; the nurse arranging it for me told me I needed to come in fasting, which, it turns out, is for a slightly more invasive procedure which involves them putting a tube with an ultrasound sensor down the throat, which is numbed prior to this. I was told also I needed to bring someone because I may be drowsy from this if they had to further sedate me, so Mom was with me up until I finished lunch.

Then Mom went home, and I went up to the AMU section where the Oncologists are and sat reading while awaiting my 3PM appointment with them. At about forty five minutes before my appointment, the receptionist at the counter asked me if I’d done my PET/CT scan follow-up yet.

What?! I hadn’t even been to that section of the hospital for an initial appointment yet.

Turns out, she meant if I’d made an appointment for it yet. That made more sense, and she told me to go make that appointment right then. This is, I think the result of my talk with Dr. Poppe from Tuesday. It’s good to know the VA is on the ball. Down in the Nuclear Medicine section of the hospital, I made my appointment for, guess what? Tomorrow! I’m to go in at ten for the PET/CT scan, which will take anywhere from two to four hours according to what I understand.

I made it back to the Oncology unit with time to spare before my appointment and checked in, had vitals taken, and went to the room instructed to wait. And wait. I read more of the book I’d brought, but also took the time to read the PET/CT paperwork the receptionist there had given me. A Resident finally came in, and we discussed things briefly, and she left. Then Nyna, the head Chemo nurse, came in and we talked much more. She had a little notebook with a lesson on breast cancer and a folder with paperwork for me to read. I saw Dr. Weiss briefly again, and he gave me a more thorough explanation of Chemo and the regimen they had planned for me.

I’m apparently to receive the “easier” Chemo regimen. This involves two drugs (down from three), and has been chosen because I had only one cancerous lymph node out of fourteen removed and they got all the cancerous tissue from my breast. They had me sign a release form, then I went back to the room with Nyna to further discuss my upcoming appointments.

They wanted to give me my first Chemo treatment on the 15th of this month . . . the afternoon of the same day I’m to get the Porta-Cath put in. I asked to change the date, and we moved the first Chemo treatment to the following Monday—the 18th. Next week is going to busy and pretty stressful, and I didn’t want to get Chemo right after undergoing a minor surgical procedure which would leave me groggy for at least part of the remainder of the day.

Then I was free to go, and boy did I hotfoot it out of there.

So, for tomorrow: 1. 10AM PET/CT scan; 2. Visit with Nyna about Chemo calendar and other sundry topics needing to be settled (for instance, what I do and when I do it for the Porta-Cath placement); and 3. Go to pharmacy to pick up anti-nausea meds so I have them on hand when the Chemo starts. I figure I should be up there all day (LOL).

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